Mattie Miracle 2021 Walk was a $125,000 success!

Mattie Miracle Cancer Foundation Promotional Video

Thank you for keeping Mattie's memory alive!

Dear Mattie Blog Readers,

It means a great deal to us that you take the time to write to us and to share your thoughts, feelings, and reflections on Mattie's battle and death. Your messages are very meaningful to us and help support us through very challenging times. To you we are forever grateful. As my readers know, I promised to write the blog for a year after Mattie's death, which would mean that I could technically stop writing on September 9, 2010. However, at the moment, I feel like our journey with grief still needs to be processed and fortunately I have a willing support network still committed to reading. Therefore, the blog continues on. If I should find the need to stop writing, I assure you I will give you advanced notice. In the mean time, thank you for reading, thank you for having the courage to share this journey with us, and most importantly thank you for keeping Mattie's memory alive.


As Mattie would say, Ooga Booga (meaning, I LOVE YOU)! Vicki and Peter



The Mattie Miracle Cancer Foundation celebrates its 7th anniversary!

The Mattie Miracle Cancer Foundation was created in the honor of Mattie.

We are a 501(c)(3) Public Charity. We are dedicated to increasing childhood cancer awareness, education, advocacy, research and psychosocial support services to children, their families and medical personnel. Children and their families will be supported throughout the cancer treatment journey, to ensure access to quality psychosocial and mental health care, and to enable children to cope with cancer so they can lead happy and productive lives. Please visit the website at: www.mattiemiracle.com and take some time to explore the site.

We have only gotten this far because of people like yourself, who have supported us through thick and thin. So thank you for your continued support and caring, and remember:

.... Let's Make the Miracle Happen and Stomp Out Childhood Cancer!

A Remembrance Video of Mattie

August 8, 2015

Saturday, August 8, 2015

Saturday, August 8, 2015

Tonight's picture was taken in July of 2007. While in Boston visiting Peter's family, this cute sailboat came out of storage and the cousins all united around the task of giving the boat a bath. You wouldn't think this could be a task that would be of any interest perhaps to a child. But to my child, such a task was right up his alley. Mattie loved water, a hose, sponges, buckets, and getting wet. Mattie was in the boat, out of the boat, and right in the mix that day.  


Quote of the day: Educating the mind without educating the heart, is no education at all. ~ Aristotle 


Though many of Maine's towns are on the Atlantic, they are not like your typical sea side communities. Or what one may think of when we think of visiting the BEACH! Maine's coastline is rugged, rocky, and has little to no sand. You are not going to be finding people walking the beach, lying out in the sun, or playing out in the water. Not only because the coastline doesn't allow for this, but also because the water is frigid. I had the opportunity to put my hand in the water and I can report it was about 62 degrees. Mind you that was warm for here. 

We did visit Hendrick's Harbor Beach, which is a lovely stretch of beach that provides sand. I assure you if there is sand, there are people out on it! There were sun bathers, kids digging in the sand, people wadding in the water, and even dogs chasing after sticks in the water. 






On this same stretch of beach was this beautiful lighthouse. But if you look closely, you can see the huge rock outcroppings that come into the water. You can clearly see from this photo you are NOT in Florida, North Carolina, or even California for that matter. It is a very distinctive coastline, that automatically orients you to Maine!


I got out of the car to snap this photo, because I liked the fact that this sailboat was passing by this lighthouse looking structure. Being a lighthouse fan, I naturally had to stop. 


We drove extensively throughout the Booth Bay area today and explored all over. We covered a lot of territory in one day by car. We got a very good feeling for the terrain and the coast.  

Booth Bay Harbor has a population of about 2,100 and in the summer months is known for its yachting and tourism. The downtown area is absolutely charming, filled with shops of all kinds, restaurants, and what caught my attention was stores feature hand crafted products. Things made in the USA. Which they are proud to sell and display! 


We then visited Pemaquid Lighthouse. Each year, about 100,000 visitors come to explore the park grounds, take in the panoramic view of the Atlantic and marvel at one of the state's best known icons. It is so honored that, in 2003, Maine citizens voted to use its likeness to represent them on the state quarter.

The tower and Keeper's House were constructed in 1827. But neither lasted long, perhaps because the builder used salt water to mix his lime mortar. Basically the first lighthouse and keeper's house disintegrated! The second contract to build a lighthouse and keeper's house in this same location stipulated that only fresh water be used. The new tower, built by stone mason Joseph Berry from was completed in 1835. A new wood frame Keeper's House was added in 1857. I asked and apparently both "new" structures look exactly like their "old" structures!


At about the same time, the tower was upgraded with new technology: the Fresnel lamp. The beacon that shines today is that same, fourth-order lamp which can be seen 14 nautical miles out to sea.

The lighthouse keepers house.











The climb -- which is about 38 steps! It is the shortest climb we have ever done to get to the top of a lighthouse. But the interior was charming and the view on top was nice but not very memorable. 







They allow five people to climb up at a time. This is because it is VERY tight and narrow on top of the lighthouse. In addition, the Fresnel lens is about 500 pounds and there is a weight limit on top. 

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