Mattie Miracle 2021 Walk was a $125,000 success!

Mattie Miracle Cancer Foundation Promotional Video

Thank you for keeping Mattie's memory alive!

Dear Mattie Blog Readers,

It means a great deal to us that you take the time to write to us and to share your thoughts, feelings, and reflections on Mattie's battle and death. Your messages are very meaningful to us and help support us through very challenging times. To you we are forever grateful. As my readers know, I promised to write the blog for a year after Mattie's death, which would mean that I could technically stop writing on September 9, 2010. However, at the moment, I feel like our journey with grief still needs to be processed and fortunately I have a willing support network still committed to reading. Therefore, the blog continues on. If I should find the need to stop writing, I assure you I will give you advanced notice. In the mean time, thank you for reading, thank you for having the courage to share this journey with us, and most importantly thank you for keeping Mattie's memory alive.


As Mattie would say, Ooga Booga (meaning, I LOVE YOU)! Vicki and Peter



The Mattie Miracle Cancer Foundation celebrates its 7th anniversary!

The Mattie Miracle Cancer Foundation was created in the honor of Mattie.

We are a 501(c)(3) Public Charity. We are dedicated to increasing childhood cancer awareness, education, advocacy, research and psychosocial support services to children, their families and medical personnel. Children and their families will be supported throughout the cancer treatment journey, to ensure access to quality psychosocial and mental health care, and to enable children to cope with cancer so they can lead happy and productive lives. Please visit the website at: www.mattiemiracle.com and take some time to explore the site.

We have only gotten this far because of people like yourself, who have supported us through thick and thin. So thank you for your continued support and caring, and remember:

.... Let's Make the Miracle Happen and Stomp Out Childhood Cancer!

A Remembrance Video of Mattie

January 13, 2020

Monday, January 13, 2020

Monday, January 13, 2020

Tonight's picture was taken on January 13, 2009. Mattie was in NYC and we were staying at a hotel. We were there so Mattie could begin experimental treatment at Memorial Sloan Kettering. When we checked into the hotel, we were greeted with a care package filled with all the amazing things you see here. Where did the care package come from? From Linda, Mattie's child life specialist at Georgetown Hospital. I do not know who appreciated this package more! But what I do know was we all felt like our DC health care team was thinking of us and was cheering us on. 


Quote of the day: Worrying does not empty tomorrow of its troubles. It empties today of its strength. ~ Corrie Ten Boom


This is a photo of the iconic Watergate Complex. I pass it practically everyday with Sunny. The Watergate Complex is a group of six buildings in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Covering a total of 10 acres and it is adjacent to the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Built between 1963 and 1971, the Watergate was considered one of Washington's most desirable living spaces, popular with members of Congress and political appointees in the executive branch. The complex has been sold several times since the 1980's. In the 1990's, it was split up and its component buildings and parts of buildings were sold to various owners.

This is a close up of the complex. On the right side is a residential building and on the left is a commercial building, with many businesses housed inside. Why am I telling you this?

Well on Friday morning, someone jumped from the commercial building. It was a suicide and our neighborhood was cordoned off and crime units were on the scene. I did not learn about this from the news or reading a paper. I learned about it from a friend who works near this building. 

Hearing about this suicide bothered me all day. As I can only imagine the lives immediately changed and forever altered by this man's death. In our serene part of the city, where we are surrounded by university students and government/business people, we rarely hear news like this. It leads me to wonder what do we do if we know someone we work with is suicidal? How likely are we to seek out help for this person, when we know that confronting this topic could jeopardize the person's job and relationships? 

I have no answers, other than I think it is important to observe and listen to those around us. As we truly never know how we can alter (for the better) someone's thoughts and feelings at any given moment. 

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